THE TOP 5 THINGS BUYERS SHOULD ASK ABOUT HOME INSPECTIONS

 So you think you have found the home of your dreams. Open floor plan, big rooms, back yard, basement. Everything you have ever wanted. But what about the things you DON’T want? Electrical issues, heating and cooling? Or what about pest infestation?

 

On the eve of the biggest purchase of your life there are many questions that loom large. Here are the top five questions regarding home inspections, that you, the buyer may have, or may have not even known you need to ask!

 

1. Are inspections “automatically” part of every home purchase?

 

No. As a buyer, you must include a home inspection clause in your purchase agreement, which will let you back out of the contract if the inspector discovers unexpected problems with the house.

 

If you still want the house, an inspection clause allows you to renegotiate with the seller in light of any issues discovered—either requesting a price adjustment, or asking the seller to make necessary repairs prior to completing the sale.

 

Home inspection clauses aren’t “automatic,” but they’re highly recommended by buyer’s agents and almost always added to standard real estate contracts. The average person isn’t going to be able to assess the condition of a home and our licensed and certified home inspectors at Inspection Tech can put your mind at ease and help you be sure you are getting the home you truly want.

 

2. What IS a home inspection?

 

A home inspection is a comprehensive review of the systems, structure and general “health” of a home, conducted by a qualified, objective inspector. If there are any issues that may degrade the value of the home, or require immediate/near-term repairs, they should be revealed by a professional home inspector.

 

What is included will depend on the individual inspector, the local municipal codes, and the type of inspection(s) you request.

 

Basic home inspections should include visual inspections of the:

 

Roof

Foundation/framing (including wood rot)

Fireplaces

Plumbing systems

Electrical systems

HVAC (heating and cooling) systems

Interiors (doors, paint, floorings, ceilings, walls, windows, etc.)

Exteriors (siding, windows, doors, etc.)

Insulation/ventilation

Additional inspections may be done for:

The presence of radon, mold, or pests

At Inspection Tech we have a team of general home inspectors as well as a certified radon and mold specialist and a licensed structural engineer

 

3. How do I select an inspector?

 

You can ask your buyer’s agent to recommend a good, qualified, local inspector. You can also find one on your own. Either way, you should consider the inspector’s qualifications, confirm if they are bonded and insured, and if they meet the requirements to be licensed in your state.

 

You may also want to ask how long they have been in the business and request references from past clients. There are a number of state/national/international professional home inspector organizations; ask your potential inspector if they are a member of any of these groups.

 

Realize that not all states require licensing, or even specialized training, to become a home inspector, so do your own due diligence.

Inspection Tech has been in business since 2008 and helps serve Northeast Ohio and beyond. We are available 7 days a week and our office assistants can answer all of your questions and make scheduling a breeze

 

4. Can I be there during the inspection?

 

Yes, you can and should be. Your buyer’s agent can handle it for you, but you’ll get a much better feel for your new house if you attend the inspection. If the inspector finds any problems, you’ll be able to ask questions, on the spot, and get the answers you need.

 

Inspectors can also offer guidance on how to properly maintain a home’s systems, which is always helpful for a new buyer. Be sure to take notes to review later, and to potentially share with the seller, so you will be able to get accurate estimates on the needed repairs.

 

5. What if the house I want fails inspection?

 

An inspection is an evaluation, not a test, which means houses can’t “fail” inspection. It’s a way to reveal any issues, or potential issues, that may negatively impact a buyer prior to completing a sale. It’s also intended to ensure both the buyer and seller are in informed agreement regarding the condition of the property that is changing hands.

 

Call us today to schedule your home inspection!